Tag Archives: human error

Human Factors at The Fringe: My Eyes Went Dark

Written and directed by Matthew Wilkinson. A thrilling modern tragedy about a Russian architect driven to revenge after losing his family in a plane crash. Cal MacAninch and Thusitha Jayasundera give electrifying performances in this searing new play about the … Continue reading

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Never/zero thinking

There has been much talk in recent years about ‘never events’ and ‘zero harm’, similar to talk in the safety community about ‘zero accidents’. It sounds obvious: no one would want an accident. And we all wish that serious harm would not result from accidents. But as expressed and implemented top-down, never/zero is problematic for many reasons. In this post, I shall outline just a few, as I see them. Continue reading

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‘Human error’ in the headlines: Press reporting on Virgin Galactic

Again, a familiar smoke pattern has emerged from the ashes of a high-profile accident. The National Transportation Safety Board held a hearing in Washington D.C. on 28 July 2015 on the Virgin Galactic crash over California on October 31, 2014. … Continue reading

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Reducing ‘the human factor’

If you work in an industry such as transportation or healthcare – where human involvement is critical – you have probably heard people talk about ‘the human factor’. This elusive term is rarely defined, but people often refer to reducing it, or perhaps mitigating it. … Continue reading

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Is ‘human error’ the handicap of human factors? A discussion among human factors specialists.

Following most major accidents, one phrase is almost guaranteed to headline in the popular press: ‘human error’. The concept is also popular in the ergonomics and human factors (EHF) discipline and profession; it is probably among the most profitable in … Continue reading

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‘Human error’: Still undefined after all these years

Despite the pervasive and controversial nature of the notion of ‘human error’ in academia, industry and society more generally, there is still – after several decades of research – little agreement on what ‘human error’ means. Tom Singleton (1973) stated that, on attempting … Continue reading

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Life After ‘Human Error’ – Velocity Europe 2014

This is a keynote address from Velocity Europe 2014 in Barcelona on 17 November. I wanted to give a fairly light presentation (it was first slot in the morning!) to summarise some key issues in moving on from a focus … Continue reading

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